The Azure of the Amalfi Coast

Philip Santos Moreira

Philip Santos Moreira

Philip Santos Moreira is the Contributing Editor at Global Storybook (Portugal/USA).
You can read more about Philip here.
Philip Santos Moreira

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Few places around the world are as iconic as the famed Amalfi Coast.  When I eventually told my parents that I visited this area with Gianluigi my mother gasped and expressed tremendous envy; apparently she had always wanted to go to the Amalfi coast.  I had not even realized it was so far south in Italy and practically a stone’s throw away from Napoli until Gian said we would be going.  I quickly refreshed my memory by Googling what exactly was so special about the Amalfi.  Browsing a few photos immediately reminded me.

The Amalfi Coast is a UNESCO World Heritage area that extends fifty kilometers along the southern section of the Sorrentine Peninsula of the Campania region.  Colorful towns are built into the cliffs which dip dramatically into the sea. There are thirteen municipalities along the Amalfi coast including, Amalfi.

Typically, people will enter by sea via ferry routes because the only road (Strada Statale 163/Amalfi Drive) is exceptionally narrow and dangerous.  Gian wanted to go with his Ducati but decided against it since we would be bringing our cameras.  The car was an interesting choice because every passing car in the opposite lane would basically ‘kiss’ (touch mirrors) as they traveled by.

Amalfi, Italy (August 2013)

Amalfi, Italy (August 2013)

The coast is nothing short of spectacular and must be included on everyone’s Italian itinerary should you have the extra time to venture away from the standard “Rome, Vatican, Venice, Florence and Milan” tour.  You should primarily go for the views unless you want to compete for spots of sand on what will be very crowded beaches.

READ MORE:
The 5 Best Panoramic Locations in Florence

The problem with the beaches along the Amalfi Coast is that they are barely strips of sand at the water’s edge; there is not a lot of sand-front.  I am not a huge fan when there is little space on the beach combined with hoards of people…  However, the temperature of the water was spectacularly warm.  I could have soaked in the water all day.

On the pier in Amalfi, Italy (August 2013)

On the pier in Amalfi, Italy (August 2013)

The town of Amalfi is the only place we really explored.  It’s a cute little place tucked away into the rocks.  It’s a small town decorated with its own Duomo with nothing to do but walk around and admire that a place such as Amalfi actually exists.  Unfortunately, my experience on the Amalfi Coast ends here.  There are however many other things of interest to see as listed on various online sources.

On the pier in Amalfi, Italy (August 2013)

On the pier in Amalfi, Italy (August 2013)

I will list a few:

  • Positano: Church of Santa Maria Assunta
  • Atrani: Churches of San Salvatore del Birecto and of Santa Maria Maddalena
  • Ravello: Villa Cimbrone and Villa Rufolo
  • Praiano: Churches of San Luca and San Gennaro and the views from these areas
  • Conca dei Marini: Church of San Pancrazio and the view
  • Minori: Church of Santa Trofimena and the Ancient Roman Villa
  • Furore: Fjiord of Furore with the Mulino Cartiera and the “Monazzeni” of Anna Magnani & Roberto Rossellini

A special thank you to Gianluigi for this trip to the Amalfi Coast.

Gian in Amalfi, Italy (August 2013)

Gian in Amalfi, Italy (August 2013)

Photography by: Philip Moreira Photography

Instagram: Philipm814

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